Pascoe Vale Osteopathy
(located within ‘Hamish Everard Natural Therapies’)
446 Gaffney Street,
Pascoe Vale 3044

Pelvic Girdle Pain in Pregnancy

What is Pelvic Girdle Pain?

Written by Dr. David Howard – B.Sc. (Clinical Sci.), M.H.Sc. (Osteopathy), B.App.Sc (Human Movement) from Pascoe Vale Osteopathy located in Pascoe Vale, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Pelvic girdle pain is a set of very commonly occurring symptoms in pregnancy and includes the conditions of sacroiliac joint dysfunction, sacroiliac joint instability, pubic symphysis dysfunction and diastasis symphysis pubis.

These conditions are all linked as they have a very similar set of symptoms but with differing intensities and primary source of pain. They can also occur together because the anatomy of the pelvis is like a ‘bowl’ with all of the bones connected in a circle. If one of the joints is affected or dysfunctional, the other joints are also likely to be affected and cannot function normally. For simplicity, the conditions are named according to where the majority of the pain is being experienced. In most cases, there will also be symptoms occurring at the other pelvic joints simultaneously.

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First Aid – Soft tissue injuries

What to do if you’ve got a soft tissue injury

Written by Dr. David Howard – B.Sc. (Clinical Sci.), M.H.Sc. (Osteopathy), B.App.Sc (Human Movement) from Pascoe Vale Osteopathy located in Pascoe Vale, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

These 1st aid tips can be applied to any soft tissue injury, such as hamstring strains, pulled calf muscles, shoulder strains, corked thighs and sprained ankles.woman-hamstring-strain

First 48 hours

The first action to take as soon as possible after the injury has occurred is RICER – Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation, Referral. This should continue for at least 48 hours after the injury as occurred. RICER helps to reduce bleeding, swelling and pain in the soft tissues. It therefore makes the recovery and healing process much faster.

Rest: Keep the body part as still as possible. This prevents further damage and slows down the bleeding in the soft tissues.

Ice: Ice is very important in reducing bleeding, swelling and pain. Never apply ice directly to the skin as it can burn. Wrap the ice source in a damp towel. Ice can mean anything from a bag of peas, a cold pack or ice cubes, whatever you have access to is fine just as long as it is very cold. Apply the ice for 20 mins, roughly every 2 hours, for the first 48 hours. Avoid pain always and use discomfort as a guide as not everyone will be able to put up with icing for a long period of time. If you are sensitive to the cold, it is better to do 3-5 mins every hour than none at all.

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Treatment and prevention of disc bulge, herniation and prolapse

Disc Bulges

Written by Dr. David Howard – B.Sc. (Clinical Sci.), M.H.Sc. (Osteopathy), B.App.Sc (Human Movement) from Pascoe Vale Osteopathy located in Pascoe Vale, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Other common names for a disc bulge are: disc prolapse, disc herniation, Ruptured Diskblown disk, slipped disc and pinched nerve.

A Doughnut…

We first need to understand a little more about the disc.  The best way to describe it is a comparison to a jam doughnut!

The disc is made up of a strong outer layer (the crusty outside), lots of water (the soft, squishy dough) with an inner core or nucleus (the jam).

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